European Schools Science Symposium 2016

The opening ceremony speech of the 13th European Schools Science Symposium

 ESSS 2016 (2)

 

Dear all,

I would like to say some words about Intellectual Property. Intellectual Property – what is that, and what does it have to do with the Science Symposium?

If you write a poem, it is your poem. You are the author, and you own it. You have copyright to your poem.

If you compose a song, it is your creation.  If somebody wants to record it, they have to ask your permission and maybe pay some compensation to you.

If you invent something new, and you present it e.g. as a poster here in the SS, it is your idea and your invention.  You have right to have  compensation, if somebody would like to profit from it.

Did you know that your poem, song and innovations are protected by Intellectual Property Rights?

IP rights are meant to help ordinary inventors, designers, authors, artists, scientists and innovators to get on with their job of being innovative. IP rights encourage people to be creative.

European schools are rather privileged, because we work in a very close collaboration with the European Patent Office (EPO) in Munich and Office of Harmonisation of Internal Markets (OHIM) in Alicante. These organisations are there to help all the creators to register their innovations and secure some profit for their work.

IP is traditionally divided in:

  • Industrial property (inventions, patents, trade marks, designs)
  • Artistic work protected by copyright (original literary or artistic works, music, TV broadcasting, software..)
  • Commercial strategies (trade secrets, know-how)

Intellectual Property Rights-intensive industries as a whole support directly or indirectly 35% of jobs, almost 39% of the EU’s GDP and 90% of external trade.

According to the OHIM Observatory,  faked products and counterfeit goods cost legitimate industry in EU approximately €59 billion per year in lost market share. This has an important impact to the jobs in EU.  According to the OHIM 650.000 jobs in Europe are involved.

Unfortunately, Intellectual Property Rights are not well understood, or even believed – especially by the younger generations. According to a recent on-line study, the attitudes and behavior of  15-24 years olds show, that there is a lack of information to understand how  Intellectual Property really works. It protects the rights of those  who innovate and create!

IP education in Europe should promote innovation and creativity and raise IP awareness and support pupils to become responsible consumers – and if possible to become innovators and creators themselves!

European Schools Science Symposium is exactly what Europe needs right now – creative science oriented boys and girls bubbling with new ideas and new innovations!

ESSS gives an excellent opportunity for young scientists to share their ideas with their peers and present them to the larger public. The symposium fosters a close community feeling between pupils from different schools and countries, and  gives an ideal setting for networking and social contacts.

I congratulate the organisation team of this event for impressive set up. I  express also  my high appreciation to the efforts of the teachers who have prepared their students for this event. And I am so proud of all our students who have made such a wonderful range of creative inventions and interesting studies!

Well done! Europe has a bright future with you!

I wish you all a very stimulating and motivating symposium!

Kari Kivinen

 

You can find here is one of the posters from European School Luxembourg 1 (Catarina Nunes, s5PO)

ESSS example

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Intellectual Property Education in Europe

Intellectual Property and Education Workshop, 8 – 9 March, OHIM, Alicante, Spain

A workshop report by Kari Kivinen

IP OHIM JPG2

Introduction

According to WIPO, “Intellectual Property (IP)“refers to creations of the mind: inventions, literary and artistic works and symbols, names and images used in commerce”

IP is traditionally divided in:

  • Industrial property (inventions, patents, trade marks, designs)
  • Artistic work protected by copyright (original literary or artistic works, music, TV broadcasting, software..)
  • Commercial strategies (trade secrets, know-how)

According to the OHIM Observatory, the counterfeit goods cost legitimate industry in EU approximately €59 billion per year in lost market share. This has an important impact to the jobs in EU. Intellectual Property Rights-intensive industries as a whole support directly or indirectly 35% of jobs, almost 39% of the EU’s GDP and 90% of external trade. Mr. Campinos, the president of OHIM declared that this means in practice that 650.000 jobs in Europe are lost, at present.

IP rights are meant to help ordinary businesses, entrepreneurs, inventors, designers, authors and innovators to get on with their job of being innovative and IP rights encourage creative activity.

Unfortunately, this message is not well understood, or even believed – especially by the younger generations. Mr. Campinos reported that according to a recent on-line study , the attitudes and behavior of  15-24 years olds show, that

  • there is a lack of information to understand the facts
  • youngsters do not really care about copyright limitations
  • there is a lack of legal alternatives, and
  • for 66 % of youngsters the price is the most important factor when purchasing goods.

One of the key objectives of the Digital Single Market in EU is to boost digital skills and learning.

Education seems to be one of the key instruments to raise understanding and respect for Intellectual Property. The question of the day was:  what path should the EU  follow?

The recently published “Intellectual Property and Education in Europe ” study notes that the most innovative non-EU countries or regions already teach IP related issues at primary level and place IP more commonly as a part of citizenship education, focusing on morals and ethics.

Education is, of course, a national competence inside of the EU. The role of the OHIM and EPO should be that of a facilitator, supporter and resources provider in issues related to the IP education in several levels.

The challenge of the IP Education Workshop was to find ways to promote IP education in the 28 Member States, and reflect what would be the most efficient strategy and methods to do so.

IP jpg

Intellectual Property and Education in Europe study 2016

The study on IP education in school curricula in the EU Member States is an excellent starting point and benchmark! The main findings were:

  • IP is not a stand-alone subject in any MS
  • Aspects of IP are mentioned in 33 curricula of EU countries/regions
  • IP connected learning areas mentioned in the curricula of 33 EU countries/regions
  • Good practices are identified

IP Curricula jpg

 

The study concluded that

  • IP has the potential to be integrated into mainstream subjects of all educational levels,
  • IP can easily be adapted to cross-curricula teaching
  • Provision of relevant and up-to-date professional resources to empower teachers is recommended
  • Innovation, creativity and entrepreneurship could be fostered

According to the study the objective of the IP Education could be formulated in a following way:

“IP education should include references to skills and competences that young people can be expected to acquire in the classroom that enable them to become familiar with IP, understand its potential to generate income and economic growth and lead them to respect IP rights, whether their own or those of others”

In the meeting additional and completing objectives were identified. IP education should

  • raise IP awareness
  • promote innovation
  • fight against piracy and counterfeits
  • support pupils to become responsible consumers

IP Kivinen jpg

Next steps

In my presentation “Intellectual Property Education in Europe” (download here the “intellectual property education” PDF file ) I tried to explore who are the key stakeholders, which are the main objectives, obstacles and challenges, and I made some proposals to tackle the issues.

I proposed to take concrete  “top down” and “down up” actions which should be carefully planned and prepared by the Task Force. The mandate of the Task Force could be as follows:

  • Produce facts and figures of the IP impact for educational leaders
  • Produce relevant IP contents for various subjects (simple, positive, benefit-orientated, objective and factual (public domain, open source)
  • Develop a set of curricula learning outcomes/standards/competences for syllabuses of various subjects
  • Formulate ethical standards and guidelines for schools
  • Map and collect good IP education practice recourses from member states and non EU-countries
  • Prepare training concept for educational leaders, Principals & teachers
  • Initiate positive campaigns, competitions and events to promote innovation
  • Propose partnerships and synergies ( artist, designers, creators, ambassadors..)
  • Launch a pilot projects to test & validate the educational program materials in some schools

I shared  a good practice example from Finland in the meeting.

Finnish Kopiosto is an umbrella organisation for associations representing performing art­ists, authors and publishers. In February 2016,  they negotiated a license deal with the Finnish Ministry of Education. The licence covers all free-of-charge education and photocopies delivered to the pupils and students of comprehen­sive schools, gymnasiums, vocational insti­tutions and universities.

Kopiosto also provides educational institutions with licences for the digital use of material. Kopiosto’s Digital licence enables the scanning of publications, copy­ing them from open Internet sites, remote education and sharing copies through school intranets.

In addition they have publish an excellent and clear worded ABC-guide for students, teachers and parents concerning all the key questions and areas related to the IP rights ( see kopiraitti.fi). This type of approach will create a safe and sound legal framework for positive collaboration between IP officers and educators!

In Brussels, 13.3.2016, Kari Kivinen

PS. See also the EURYDICE report about Entrepreneurship Education at School in Europe

EE

The educational challenge of multilingualism in Europe

Greek title

La 25ème Conférence adressée aux enseignants grecs en Europe, le 7 mars 2016, sur le sujet «Le multiculturalisme en Europe et l’éducation grecque face à de nouveaux défis».

Après les derniers développements dans la crise de l’immigration et les attaques terroristes sur les villes européennes, l’Union Européenne a
besoin de la sécurité, la stabilité sociale, la croissance et la cohésion sociale. L’école étant un des premiers cadres ou les jeunes peuvent utiliser
la diversité des nationalités et des cultures de façon constructive, c’est à dire en apprenant le respect mutuel, la coopération, la tolérance
et la solidarité, il est absolument nécessaire d’identifier les moyens pédagogiques et politiques pour achever ces buts.
La Conférence, qui se déroule sous le patronage du Président du Comité Economique et Social Européen M Georges Dassis, est organisé par le
Bureau du Conseiller de l’Education de l’Ambassade de Grèce à Bruxelles en collaboration avec les Services de l`UE (DG COMM) dans les locaux
de la Commission Européenne.

You can find here the presentation of Dr Kivinen in English: “Multilingual challenge of Europe “!

 

grec